Reasons To Study Mechanical Engineering

Why study a mechanical engineering degree? The Complete University Guide is on hand to lend its expertise, and give you the nudge you need. Here are some compelling reasons to study mechanical engineering:

Mechanical Engineers have good graduate prospects

In a notoriously tough graduate job market it’s fair to say that degree-level engineers have an edge.  Engineers build societies and, mechanical engineers specifically, apply fundamental maths and physics laws to create and build mechanical devices we use every day.

So it’s no surprise to see that mechanical engineer students enjoy particularly good graduate prospects. Our What do graduates do? table shows that 81% of mechanical engineers were in positive destination 6 months after graduating in 2013. A positive destination means either professional-level employment or postgraduate study.

Mechanical Engineers enjoy great starting salaries

People with mechanical engineering skills are highly valued in society and their salaries reflect that fact. As the What do graduates earn? table shows, mechanical engineer graduates in professional jobs receive, on average, £26,197 a year, rising to between £40,000 and £55,000 after 10 years in the job. The UK average salary is £26,500 so we can safely say you’d be ‘doing well’.

Mechanical Engineers are multi-skilled

One might refer to a qualified mechanical engineer as a jack-of-all-trades, and those in the engineering sector often do. Mechanical engineers have a working knowledge of computer applications, electricity, structures, mathematics, and physics, plus they’re required to have some understanding of social, environmental, and economic factors.

If a technical degree incorporating a broader understanding of the world sounds appealing, mechanical engineering may be for you.

Pursue a dual honours degree in order to combine an engineering education with another passion of yours. Here’s a list of Mechanical Engineering with Management courses to get you started.

Engineering skills gap

According to EngineeringUK’s report The State of Engineering 2015, the UK will need to have recruited 1.82 million people with engineering skills from 2012–22. And with only 100,000 people being recruited a year, the sector is falling far short. As well as reinforcing your chances of good graduate prospects and a decent salary, this also means that if you pursue a mechanical engineering career you’ll be contributing to the UK’s well-being and economic growth.

Global opportunities

There isn’t a country in the world that doesn’t need its engineers and there are a number of mechanical engineering courses which can testify to that.

Take a look at the CUG Course Chooser and browse through mechanical engineering courses across the UK. You’ll come across a fair few which offer a year spent studying abroad.

Here’s some courses with a year abroad offered by Imperial, Sheffield, and Southampton. You might find yourself in China, Malaysia or the US, just to name a few far off locations – calling all adventurous types.

The huge variety of mechanical engineering courses

The CUG Course Chooser lists more than 900 mechanical engineering courses. With such a broad range of study programmes available up and down the country, you’re sure to find something that suits your needs.    

Mechanical Engineers are at the forefront of future technologies

Mechanical engineering is at the forefront of developing new technologies for a number of industries including transport, healthcare, construction, and robotics. What an exciting time to be alive and what an exciting time to be a mechanical engineer.

But we hope the future doesn't look like this: