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Study Medical Technology & Bioengineering, why & how to study

Medical Technology & Bioengineering is one of the many offshoots of Medicine. It contains several different disciplines and potential routes of study.

Medical Research Scientist Looking Through the Microscope

CONTENTS

  1. What’s Medical Technology & Bioengineering?

  2. What Medical Technology & Bioengineering degrees can you study?

  3. What do you need to get onto a Medical Technology & Bioengineering degree?

  4. What topics does a Medical Technology & Bioengineering degree cover?

  5. How will you be assessed?

  6. Why study Medical Technology & Bioengineering?

  7. What do Medical Technology & Bioengineering graduates earn?

  8. What jobs can you get as a Medical Technology & Bioengineering graduate?

  9. What are the postgraduate opportunities?

  10. Similar subjects to Medical Technology & Bioengineering

  11. Have any questions?

What’s Medical Technology & Bioengineering?

Medical Technology & Bioengineering is where technology and science are used to diagnose, monitor and treat the diseases that affect humans. It encompasses a wide range of disciplines and learning.

Research is generally focused on improving the quality of healthcare provided through better diagnosis, reducing the invasiveness or time taken for treatment, and lowering the time needed to be spent in hospital.

What Medical Technology & Bioengineering degrees can you study?

Undergraduate degrees in Medical Technology & Bioengineering include:

  • Biomedical Engineering BEng/MEng
  • Bioengineering BEng/Meng/MSc
  • Clinical Technology BSc
  • Diagnostic Radiography BSc
  • Prosthetics and Orthotics BSc

Options may include an integrated foundation year or master’s. Industry experience and study abroad are also available.

What do you need to get onto a Medical Technology & Bioengineering degree?

Typically, entry to an undergraduate Medical Technology & Bioengineering degree requires between 104–136 UCAS points. Some courses may have lower or higher requirements, and not all unis base their offer on UCAS points. Qualifications may include:

  • A Levels: A*AA–CCE
  • BTECs: DDD–MMP (or in combination with A Levels)
  • Scottish Highers: AAAAA– AABB (Advanced Highers: AAA–AB)
  • International Baccalaureate: 39–35
  • Universities will usually ask that you have studied: advanced or higher-level maths, physics, chemistry or biology – check with your university

Other good subjects to have studied include:

  • Further maths, computer science or engineering science
  • General subjects at A Level may not be accepted

Experience that would look good on your application:

  • Work experience or shadowing in a related area, such as a hospital
  • Volunteering in a patient-focused role if you’re considering a career in the NHS
  • Stretching your engineering skills by taking part in MOOCs, competitions or challenges
  • Further research into the work and topical issues, from TED talks, podcasts, or the websites of professional bodies like the Institute of Engineering and Technology (IET) or Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine (IPEM)
  • Summer schools, if eligible – these could include In2scienceUK or Sutton Trust

Other requirements for this subject include:

  • Pass in the practical element of science taken at A Level
  • Attend an interview
  • You may be required to complete Disclosure and Barring Services (DBS) checks (or PVG scheme in Scotland) if working directly with patients

What topics does a Medical Technology & Bioengineering degree cover?

Typical modules for courses in this subject include:

  • Clinical instrumentation and imaging
  • Embedded electronics
  • Foundations in health and disease
  • Machine learning for biomedical applications
  • Mathematics for biomedical engineering
  • Medical and biochemical science
  • Medical innovation and enterprise
  • Nanomedicine
  • Rehabilitation and prosthetics
  • Tissue engineering and regenerative medicine

How will you be assessed?

Courses are assessed in a variety of ways, depending on the module:

  • Coursework
  • Exams
  • A research project or dissertation is usually a final year option

Why study Medical Technology & Bioengineering?

Medical Technology & Bioengineering takes engineering skills and applies them to the field of medicine – you could be designing solutions that directly improve someone’s quality of life.

Career-specific skills:

  • Scientific knowledge combined with engineering skills to create solutions such as artificial joints, imaging equipment, or assistive or wearable technology

Transferable skills:

  • Communication
  • Critical and analytical thinking
  • Entrepreneurial mindset
  • Numeracy and digital literacy
  • Presentation
  • Problem solving
  • Project management
  • Research

Professional accreditation:

  • Engineering degrees may be accredited by the Institute of Engineering and Technology (IET) and Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine (IPEM)
  • May include partial or full registration as a Chartered Engineer (CEng)
  • Degrees such as radiography or prosthetics and orthotics must be approved by the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC) and may be endorsed by professional bodies

What do Medical Technology & Bioengineering graduates earn?

Medical Technology & Bioengineering graduates can expect an entry-level salary of around £25,000.

Graduates can apply to join the NHS Scientist Training Programme (STP), earning a salary of around £31,000 while training (NHS Band 6). Entry to this programme is highly competitive. Once qualified, your income could be from £40,000–£53,000 (NHS Band 7 to Band 8a) in a role like senior rehabilitation engineer, depending on experience.

Or as a senior regulatory affairs specialist for a medical technology company, you could be paid £33,000–£43,000.

What jobs can you get as a Medical Technology & Bioengineering graduate?

Medical Technology & Bioengineering degrees can line you up for lab work, research posts, public health or teaching. Particular roles include:

  • Associate medical physicist
  • Biomedical engineer
  • Clinical engineer
  • Lab technician
  • Management consultant
  • Medical regulatory affairs specialist
  • Project manager
  • Senior rehabilitation engineer
  • Software engineer

What are the postgraduate opportunities?

Postgraduate study is an option if your first degree was in a related subject such as science or engineering. Examples of taught master’s and research degrees at postgraduate level include:

  • Advanced Chemical Engineering with Healthcare Technology PGDip/MSc
  • Bioimaging Sciences MRes
  • Medical Devices Engineering MSc
  • Sport Biomechanics MSc

Similar subjects to Medical Technology & Bioengineering

Other subject areas that might appeal to you include:

Have any questions?

If you’ve got any questions about studying Medical Technology & Bioengineering, you can email our experts at ask@thecompleteuniversityguide.co.uk. We’ll be happy to hear from you!

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